Diese Website verwendet Cookies für Analysen, personalisierte Inhalte und interessenbezogene Anzeigen. Indem Sie diese Website weiter nutzen, erklären Sie sich mit dieser Verwendung einverstanden. Weitere Informationen

Themenbereich The magic of films

Ein wichtiges Thema in der 7. Klasse in Englisch ist das Verstehen von Texten. Genau dazu liefert dieser Artikel Erklärungen und Beispiele.

The Magic of Films

1. Movies in Hollywood

Hollywood is a suburb of Los Angeles, California. The film industry started in Hollywood in the early 20th Century and soon this suburb became home to many great movie stars. In the early days of Hollywood cinema there were four major film companies (Columbia, Paramount, RKO, Warner Bros.) and several minor companies as well as rental studios. A pioneer of American motion pictures was the director D.W. Griffith. By the 1920s Hollywood was world famous for its productions, promoting stars like Jean Harlow, Judy Garland and Marlene Dietrich. Between 1930 and 1945 the city and the entire area changed into a huge entertainment factory controlled by two giant studios, Metro Goldwyn Mayer Inc. (MGM) and Paramount. World famous are the Hollywood Sign, the Sunset Boulevard and the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

When TV was developed, the Hollywood studios began to decline, because fewer people went to the cinemas and making movies also became more expensive. However, TV studios and music production companies moved to Hollywood, continuously changing the character of boomtown. Today movies are still made in Hollywood and Universal Studios – where one can watch the stars live on set – are one of California’s greatest tourist attractions. American movies are watched by a world wide audience shaping our ideas about the American Way of Life. Unfortunately, for many people this is the only source to learn about the United States, which often creates an unrealistic, distorted view of America. (Words: 293)

Vocabulary:

suburb - Vorstadt
huge - groß
giant - riesig
decline - nachlassen, abflauen, zurückgehen
fewer - weniger
to distort - verzerren
view - Sicht

1.2 Reading Comprehension

Right or wrong? Please circle the correct answer.

1.

Hollywood started making movies in the early 19th century.

true

false

2.

In the early days of Hollywood there where many different film companies.

true

false

3.

With the dawn of TV, Hollywood studios became even more successful.

true

false

4.

The success of Hollywood changed the appearance of the entire area.

true

false

5.

The Paramount Studios are a famous tourist attraction.

true

false

6.

American movies show a realistic picture of the American Way of Life.

true

false

2. American English vs. British English

You may have noticed that some words are spelled differently. There are also many different words used in British and American English. Below you find a few examples.

Die folgende Tabelle ist aus technischen Gründen in der mobilen Version der Homepage nicht sichtbar. Bitte rufen Sie die Seite mit einen PC auf. Alternativ können Sie die pdf Datei am Ende der Seite öffnen.

Bitte entschuldigen Sie die Unannehmlichkeiten.

Deutsch
Anhänger (Auto)
Anwalt
Apotheke

Arbeit

Arznei, Medizin

Auseinandersetzung

ausfüllen (Formular)

Autobahn

Bahnsteig

Benzin
Berufschule

böse, irr, verrückt

Briefkasten

Briefträger
Bonbon

2te Etage
Garten
Geldbeutel
Hauptfach

Fahrstuhl / Aufzug

Farbe

Film

Firma
Flugzeug

Friseur (Frauen)

Friseur (Männer)
Führerschein

Fußball

Fußgängerüberweg
Geldschein

Gepäck

Geschmack, Aroma

Grundschule

Halbjahr, Semester

Herbst
Hose

Kino
Klasse (Schule)

Kleiderschrank

Kneipe
Kumpel
krank
Mülleimer
nach Maß

Papiertaschentuch

Programm
Punkt

Schulleiter

Schulzeugnis

streiten

Stundenplan

Tankstelle

Taschenlampe

Urlaub, Ferien

Verkäufer/in
weiterführende
Schule

Wohnung

Zentrum

BE
caravan
solicitor, barrister
chemist's (shop)

labour

medicine

row

to fill in

motorway

platform

petrol
technical college

mad

letterbox

postman
sweet

on the second floor
garden
purse
main subject

lift

colour

film

company
aeroplane

hairdresser

hairdresser
driving license

football

pedestrian crossing
note

luggage

flavour

(basic) primary school

term

autumn
trousers

cinema
class

wardrobe

pub
mate
ill
rubbish bin
made-to-measure

tissue

programme
full stop

headmaster/mistress
head teacher

school report

to quarrel

timetable

filling station

torch

holiday

shop assistant

secondary school

flat

centre

AE
trailer
attorney, lawyer
drugstore

labor

drugs

argument

to fill out

freeway, interstate

track

gas
vocational school

crazy

mailbox

mailman
candy

on the third floor
yard
wallet
major

elevator

color

movie

enterprise
airplane

hairdresser, beauty shop

barber shop
driver’s license

soccer

crosswalk
bill

baggage, luggage

flavor

elementary school
grade school

semester

fall
pants

movie theater
grade

closet

bar
buddy
sick
garbage can
custom-made

Kleenex

program
period

principal

report card

to argue

schedule

gas station

flashlight

vacation

store clerk, vender

High School

apartment

center

As you can see, there are spelling differences and often the used words are completely different. Furthermore, there are also differences in pronunciation, punctuation, the use of tenses, the spelling of the dates and many other distinctions. You might have noticed that the headlines in this exercise are mostly in capital letters. In British English only the first word of a headline is spelled in capital letters.

English is spoken in many different countries of the world which explains the many varieties of the English language. Scottish and Irish English, Canadian English, Australian English and South African English all vary to the Queen’s English.

3. The Portrait of a Star

This chapter is about the magic of movies. At the end you will be able to do a group project on your favorite movie star. Before you start, try to collect homepage-addresses, pictures, articles and other interesting material and make your own notes in a separate exercise book.

3.1. Homepage of a Star: Johnny Depp

Look at www.johnnydepp.com and you will find nearly everything there is to know about his life. You will find many pictures and movie trailers and his filmography. Below you find an excerpt from his biography:

Johnny Depp, born in Kentucky on June 9th 1963 has followed a bizarre road, consequently landing him as one of today's top Hollywood actors. Born John Christopher Depp II, young Depp was originally interested in pursuing a music career. Following a move to Florida, and his parents divorce by age 16, Depp strayed from his peers and siblings and reclused within a life of drugs and alcohol. Teenage Depp dropped out of school to pursue a career in rock and roll music. Over the next few years, Depp fronted numerous garage bands - the most famous entitled The Kids, opened for Iggy Pop. Perhaps more importantly, the success of The Kids furnished Depp with a rising sense of popularity and accomplishment - ironically shot down by Iggy Pop himself during a back-stage confrontation. [......]

In 1998, Depp split with supermodel Kate Moss and started a relationship with French singer Venessa Paradis [sic], relocating to Paris with his two children (Lily-Rose and Jack) in hope to pursue a more normal life. [.......]

When Depp returned to Hollywood, it was with none other than the smash hit Pirates of the Caribbean (2003) - which made $200 million in only four weeks. [.......]” (Words: 200)

Vocabulary:

to stray - weglaufen, umherirren
peer - Gleichaltriger
siblings - Geschwister
to recluse - als Einsiedler leben
to furnish - versehen, ausstatten
to pursue - fortführen, betreiben

3.2. Homepage of a Star: Cameron Diaz

Now look at http://www.cameron-diaz.org and you will find a lot of information about this Hollywood actress. You can read her biography and filmography. This homepage is different to the one of Johnny Depp. Why do you think that is?

Below you find an excerpt from Cameron Diaz’ homepage:

Cameron Michelle Diaz was born August 30, 1972 and raised in Long Beach, California. Cameron, part Cuban, part Native-American and part German, was a mischievous kid and says that she would ’cause trouble and then duck it’. When Cameron was just 16 years old, she was scouted by Elite Models and left home to pursue a modeling [sic] career. In the next 5 years, she lived in big fashion-locations such as Paris, Japan, Australia, Mexico and Marocco and was a model for Kalvin Clein, Levi’s and Coca-Cola.

In 1994, at the age of 21, Cameron auditioned for the role as Jim Carrey’s girlfriend, femme fatale Tina Carlyle, in comedy The Mask. […] After starring opposite Ewan McGregor in Danny Boyle’s A Life Less Ordinary, she took on the title role in blockbuster romantic comedy There’s Something About Mary, directed by the Farrelly brothers. […]

During 2004 and 2005, Cameron explored some of the environmentally unique locations on the planet while discovering ways to help preserve them for the 10-episode series Trippin’ on MTV. She travelled with friends like Drew Barrymore, Jessica Alba, Rbecca Rominj Stamos and Kid Rock. When talking about the series Cameron says “I didn’t want a reality show about me being cute, I wanted to make the locations the star. Patagonia is one of the purest places on the planet, but now it’s starting to fall apart from the pollution”. […]

Who knows what more the future has in store for Cameron Diaz, and to quote herself; “I don’t know what I’m doing half the time, but I enjoy doing it”, […] (Words: 265)

Vocabulary:

mischievous - bösartig, schadenfroh, spitzbübisch
duck it - den Kopf einziehen, kneifen
auditioned - vorsprechen
blockbuster - Kassenschlager, Renner
environmentally - ökologisch, umweltbedingt
unique - einzigartig, unverwechselbar
cute - niedlich, knuffig
pollution - Umweltverschmutzung
in store - vorrätig, hier: was die Zukunft bereit hält

3.3 Your Task

Describe your favorite movie star and give all additional information about her or him that you find interesting.

Here are a few questions that might help you:

  • Is she or he a good actress/actor?
  • Does she or he like to play difficult/funny/complex/mean/positive/negative characters?
  • What are the most famous roles?
  • What are your favorite movies by your star?
  • Do the media focus on the private life rather than the movie roles? …

You can create a little journal, a speech or a wall newspaper.

4. A Group Project

If you would like to prepare a group project you have to complete the following steps:

1st step:

Decide on the topic.

2nd step:

Where and how can you get the necessary material?
Think of websites, photos and texts from magazines, books, newspapers or material from fan clubs. Does anybody in your group have a special skill (e.g. great illustrator)?

3rd step:

Collect and organize your material.
Make a list of everything you have collected and mark important parts in each text.
Decide on the tasks of each person in your group and distribute the necessary material.

4th step:

Plan your presentation.

Below you find some useful tips to deliver your presentation:

DON’TS

DOS

Don’t just read a finished text out loud because your listeners will get bored quickly.

Try to speak freely with the help of the notes you made. Highlight keywords. Try to look people in the eye, this will keep them focused.

Don’t give the whole job to one person – it is a group project!

Every group member needs a task.

Don’t let one person do all the talking.

Every group member should speak.

Don’t just use one medium.

Try to use different media. Hang up a poster, play a CD with film music or – if you have the possibility – show parts of a video.

5. Preparing an Interview

Imagine you have the possibility to interview your favorite celebrity. Make a list of questions you would like to ask him or her.

Below you find some useful examples:

  • Introduce yourself and thank the interviewee for their time.
  • You don’t need to ask your star where he or she was born. Do you research!
  • Focus on interesting questions!
  • When did you start your career?
  • Where did you go to school?
  • What would you do if you hadn’t become an actor/musician/politician … ?
  • Do you still have a lot of free time? What do you like to do in your free time?
  • How important is family/fame/religion … to you? …
5.1 Your Task

1. Write a dialogue between you as a reporter and a star you like. You are the interviewer.
2. You can use your made up interview to practice reported speech.
3. Write a short text about your favorite star or group (about 100 words).
Use the following questions:

  • Who is your favorite star or group?
  • What do you know about him, her or them?
  • Have you seen your favorite star or group on TV/live on stage? – When?
  • What do your parents think of him, her or them?
  • Do they have any reasons for their thoughts?
  • Do you buy shirts or other products with the name or picture of him, her or them?
6. Harry Potter and Joanne Kathleen Rowling

The adventures of the young wizard are international bestsellers and the movies that followed have been highly successful. Harry Potter is the central character in a series of books for children and adults alike. Since 1997, when the first book, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone was published, more than 30 million copies have been sold worldwide. The books follow the brave adventures of a boy who learns on his 11th birthday that he is the orphaned son of two powerful wizards and that he has magical power. Harry is called from his life as an unwanted foster child to become a student at Hogwarst, an English boarding school for wizards. He makes several new friends there who later become his closest allies and help him discover the truth about his parents’ mysterious death. The author of these children’s books is Joanne K. Rowling. When she was interviewed by internet users she talked about how she wrote Harry Potter:

Q.:

Where do you get your ideas from?

Rowling:

I wish I knew. Sometimes they just come like magic and at other times I have to sit and think about a week before I manage to work out how something will happen. Where the idea for Harry Potter actually came from I really couldn’t tell you. I was travelling on a train between Manchester and London and it just popped into my head. I spent four hours thinking about what Hogwarts would be like – the most interesting journey I’ve ever taken. By the time I got off the train many of the characters in the books had already been invented.

Q.:

Are any of the characters in the books based on real people?

Rowling:

Tricky question! The answer is yes, and no. I have to confess that Harry’s friend Hermine is a little bit like I was at her age, though I was never as clever or as annoying (I hope!). Ron is a little bit like my oldest friend and Professor Snape is a lot like one of my old teachers, but I’m not saying which one.

Q.:

Did you expect the Harry Potter books to be this successful?

Rowling:

Never. I just wrote the sort of thing I liked reading when I was younger (and still enjoy them now!). In fact, I didn’t expect lots of people to like them.

Ms. Rowling’s talent as a writer has made her one of Britain’s wealthiest women. She is the third best paid woman in the country. In June 2000 she was honoured by the Queen for her service to children’s literature in a special ceremony.
(Source: The Daily Telegraph, July 3 2000.)

Vocabulary:

brave - tapfer
orphaned - verwaist
foster child - Pflegekind
annoying - lästig, nervig, störend
wealthiest - vermögendste

6.1 Questions on the Text

Complete the sentences by using suitable phrases or facts from the text.

1) The first volume of the series appeared in _______________________.
2) Since then people all over the world bought __________________________.
3) That’s why J. K. Rowling became one of the _____________________________________.

Give your own opinion.
1) If you had magical power, how would you use it?
2) What do you prefer: reading or seeing a film? Give reasons for your answer.

Translate the following sentences:
1. Welches Buch magst du lieber? Harry Potter Band I oder Band II?
________________________
2. Was lesen Sie am liebsten?
________________________
3. Ich möchte einen guten Reiseführer auf Deutsch kaufen.
________________________
4. Haben Sie auch Kalender mit Photos aus dieser Gegend?
________________________
5. Ich brauche ein Geburtstagsgeschenk. Haben Sie den neuen Harry Potter?

.

Musterlösung „The Magic of Films“

1.2 Reading Comprehension


1. false
2. true
3. false
4. true
5. false
6. false

3.2, 3.3, 5.1

There is no right or wrong answer to these questions. If you have to answer tasks like these, always make notes before you start writing the entire text. This will help you to structure your text well. Always answer in full sentences and pay attention to good English. Always reread what you have written.

6.1 Questions on the Text

Complete the sentences by using suitable phrases or facts from the text.

1) The first volume of the series appeared in 1997.
2) Since then people all over the world bought more than 30 million books.
3) That’s why J. K. Rowling became one of the wealthiest women in Great Britain.

Give your own opinion.
1) If you had magical power, how would you use it?
2) What do you prefer: reading or seeing a film? Give reasons for your answer.

There is no right or wrong answer to these questions. Be careful to give enough arguments to back up your opinion and pay attention to good English.

Translate the following sentences:
1. Which book do you prefer? Harry Potter Volume one or two?
2. What do you prefer reading?

What kind of literature do you prefer?
3. I would like to buy a good travel guide in German.
4. Do you also have calendars with photos of this region?
5. I need/am looking for a birthday present. Do you have the new Harry Potter?

Themenbereich Generation Conflict

Generation Conflict

In this exercise you will practise how to answer questions on the text, how to express your feelings and emotions and how to write summaries and characterizations.

1. How to become more interesting

“I won’t allow you to go out in this mini skirt” – or: “We don’t expect you to wear these tight black jeans and those shoes with the high heels”:

Many youngsters have often heard these remarks and the result was either that they stayed at home and lay on the couch in their room with the doors locked, or the result was that they rushed out of the house and did it for spite. Sounds familiar? Maybe your friends have encouraged you to talk to your parents: “I know, you expect me to wear things you think are fashionable for young people but I prefer to put on things which I think suit me. You can’t count on me learning at school if I look silly.” If your parents are sensible people their response might be like this. “I believe that our daughter is no longer a child, she has taken the first steps towards becoming a grown-up.” Or “She is still our daughter, we are a respected family and I dislike her walking in the street in these clothes.”

There are many other things teens can be blamed for. They can dye their hair preferably green or other crazy colours and experiment with make-up, they can wear old-fashioned trousers they found in the attic, they can put on intentionally torn jeans with black lacy underwear everybody can see through or they can have their ears, their noses or eye brows pierced. And Dad can’t help saying that only bulls wear a nose ring like that.

Even the strictest parents cannot prevent their children from doing something that seems “modern”, even the most diplomatic parents don’t often find a way of stopping new trends. When you plan to act grown-up don’t keep away from arguments but try to find solutions. Parents always can be a problem, can’t they?
(Words: 308)

Vocabulary:

spite
encouraged
a grown-up
to dye ones hair
intentionally
torn
lacy underwear
argument

Boshaftigkeit, Gehässigkeit
ermutigt, angespornt
ein Erwachsener
sich die Haare färben
aus Absicht, absichtlich, vorsätzlich
zerrissen, eingerissen
Spitzenunterwäsche
Streit, Diskussion, Auseinandersetzung

1.2 Comprehension

1) According to the text: In which two ways can young people react when something isn’t allowed?
2) What other fashion experiments can you find in the text?
3) What solution(s) does the text suggest?
4) The text begins with two typical remarks. Write down three other “typical” remarks your parents could say.

1.3. Discuss

1) Why are arguments necessary for the development of a young person?
2) Should parents be strict and forbid their kids certain clothes or trends? Why or why not?

2. How to answer “Questions on the text”

Read the text once.
Read the text a second time. Make notes or underline important words or phrases.
Look up words you don’t know before you answer questions.

There are different forms of “Questions on the texts”.

If you have to answer questions

  • only include the author’s opinion
  • do not comment (I think, In my opinion …)
  • use your own words
  • (If you do use a quote, make the quote visible with quotation marks “” and give the line of the text.)

Sometimes questions on the text can be true or false or multiple choice questions.

These questions can be a bit tricky. Always read the questions carefully and make sure you understand the question correctly. Look closely at the text before you answer the questions.

As you get older you will be asked to give your opinion on something more and more. Many of the useful arguments you can use for your own argumentation are “hidden” in the text already. When you give your opinion

  • make notes first, this helps you to structure your text
  • use phrases like: In my opinion, I think/believe, I find this (text) …
  • don’t just state an argument, explain what you mean
  • give examples
  • always re-read your text
3. How to get a son-in-law

If you paid attention to your history teacher you might remember that in the Stone Age our ancestors had to do everything by themselves. But in the course of time there have been many specialisations. Bakers bake our bread, farmers produce our food, policemen look after our security and tailors make our clothes. Today, there are even home sitters for your house or flat when you go on a holiday.

When our family left the town for the Caribbean Sea the home sitter was instructed: 1) watering the flowers, 2) feeding the dog and the cat, 3) getting the mail out of the mail box, 4) answering the telephone, 5) cleaning the rooms once a week – the family’s cleaner, Mrs Porridge, was supposed to help – and airing the rooms every day, 7) pulling down the blinds at night and pulling them up next morning, 8) checking whether everything is in order.

Our home sitter wasn’t allowed to smoke or empty all the bottles of wine and cognac. No girl was permitted to stay during the night either! But there was one exception. It was a rainy afternoon when the doorbell rang. Our home sitter went to the front door. There was a young girl with a huge umbrella at the door. She was rather beautiful, as far as our home sitter could tell. She was wearing denim jeans, shoes with high heels and a sweater.

Our home sitter wasn’t surprised, as the doorbell often rang and people delivered newspapers and magazines or wanted to sell something. Our pretty girl on the other hand was totally amazed to see the young man opening the door because she had never seen him before. She began to stutter nervously, “What are you doing here? Where are my parents?” It was a funny situation when they where sitting together having their dinner. They had a lot to talk about. One can say it was love at first sight! When our family came back from our holidays my wife almost passed out when she saw our home sitter holding hands with our daughter.
(Words: 348)

Vocabulary:

Stone Age
ancestors
instructed
blinds
permitted
exception
to stutter
love at first sight
to pass out

Steinzeit
Vorfahren
angewiesen
Jalousien
erlaubt, gestattet
Ausnahme, Sonderfall
stottern, stammeln
Liebe auf den ersten Blick
ohnmächtig werden

3.1 Comprehension

a) True or false?
In the Stone Age people had to do everything by themselves. T F

b) Multiple Choice

The family went on holidays in the

Caribbean Sea
The Baltic Sea
Canada

c) What was the home sitter supposed to do while the family was on holidays?

d) Give your opinion. Do you believe in love at first sight?

4. Expression of feelings and opinions

Betty and Jenny

First read the dialogue between the two women, than try to answer the questions.

Betty: Hi! I’m Betty Miller, nice to meet you. We’re neighbours. I live over there.
Jenny: Oh, pleased to meet you. My name is ...
Betty: Jenny Clyber, I know. And you and your family just moved here from Chicago to take over old Watson’s gas station. (laughs) Right?
Jenny: (also laughs) Right! It’s a small village here. News travel quickly!
Betty: Well, it’s really a small place. Did you run a gas station in Chicago, too?
Jenny: Well, actually Harry, that’s my husband, until recently he was running a chain of hundreds of gas stations all over the country.
Betty: Hundreds? Wow! So, how comes – I’m sorry, I guess times are hard, aren’t they?
Jenny: No, no nothing like this! The company he was working for is in good shape. And they didn’t want him to leave. No, we decided to downsize!
Betty: Ah...., I see.
Jenny: It’s probably difficult to understand. But sometimes you realize that success and money aren’t everything. Hardly ever did he see our children.
Betty: Oh.
Jenny: Harry was always under terrible pressure. He had a twelve-hour day on average. He was travelling here and there and everywhere and had only very little time at home.
Betty: Oh, that’s tough. For every family member!
Jenny: It wasn’t easy. We were living in a beautiful home with all that..., but, you know, when you never see each other...
Betty: You have two kids, don’t you?
Jenny: Yes, a girl and a boy. Patrick is 16 and Hillary is 15. And they were growing up without their father. And he didn’t know what was going on in their lives.
Betty: So, did something happen? I’m sorry, I shouldn’t ask questions. My husband William always tells me not to stick my nose in where it doesn’t belong.
Jenny: (laughs) It’s not a secret! There was a special moment that changed things for us. It was Hillary’s birthday. She was celebrating with some friends when Harry arrived home, tired as usual. He had completely forgotten that it was Hillary’s birthday. As soon as he came into the house he started to complain about the loud music. Well, when he found out what was going on, he was shocked. And he started to ask himself what kind of father he was...
Betty: Not enough parents ask themselves that question...
Jenny: After that we all sat together and we discussed what we thought about the situation. We asked what was important to us, what we could do. We all agreed that we couldn’t continue that way and that we needed to change things – although our two kids didn’t want to move away from their friends!
Betty: You can’t have everything in life. And I’m sure they’re happy their father is there for them now.
Jenny: Exactly. Anyway, to cut a long story short, Harry left his job; we sold our house in Chicago and moved here. From now on one gas station will be enough!
Betty: Well, I think it’s a wonderful story. Not everyone would have changed life in that way. I really admire you!
(Words: 493)

Vocabulary:

gas station
to run
to guess
shape
to downsize
pressure
on average
to celebrate
to complain
to admire

Tankstelle
hier: betreiben
meinen, denken, annehmen (AE), ahnen
Zustand, Form
verkleinern, herunterfahren
Druck
im Durchschnitt
etwas feiern, zelebrieren
beschweren, beklagen, jammern
bewundern

4.1 Comprehension

1) Write a summary of the plot!
2) Give a short characterization of Betty and Jenny.
3) What do you think about the solution for Jenny’s family problem?
4) Do you think that Betty and Jenny will become friends?
5) Write a dialogue between Hillary and one of her new classmates, telling the story from her point of view.

5. How to write a summary
  • Read the text carefully! Try to understand what the text is about.
  • When you clearly understand the writer's major point (or purpose) for writing, read the text again. This time underline the major points (words or phrases here and there rather than complete sentences) and/or make notes on the side.
  • Now begin writing your summary. Start with a sentence naming the writer and text title and stating the main idea. Then write your summary with every important aspect of the text.
  • In a summary, do not insert your own opinions or thoughts; instead summarize what the writer has to say about the subject.
  • Try to write fluently – connect the paragraphs with words and phrases like:

in addition – moreover – furthermore – on the one hand … on the other hand – what is more – additionally – finally – at last – after all – to sum up – to come to a conclusion – in the end

  • After you've completed your text, read your summary carefully and check for accuracy. (Does your summary make the same points as the article? Do you have forgotten anything important? Are there spelling mistakes? Are you judging what the author is saying?)
  • Keep in mind that a summary should generally be no more than one-fourth the length of the original. If your summary is too long, cut out words rather than ideas. Delete non-essential words or phrases.
6. How to write a characterization

Please note:
There are two different kinds of characterization:
Direct characterization: There is a concrete information about the look and character of a person (blond hair, fat, small, loud, always laughing, sad eyes …)
Indirect characterization: There is a description of a person’s appearance and experience, so that you can suggest the person’s character.

  • Read the text carefully. Find out all about the character(s). Mark the words or sentences or write down the lines that give you information about the character(s).
  • Ask yourself if the character(s) change(s) during the development of the text. If so, how do(es) he / she / they change and why?
  • At the beginning of your characterization write a short introduction in which you present the character(s) and his or her (their) situation.
  • Write in paragraphs. Every paragraph should deal with one characteristic feature (e.g. polite, angry, nervous, etc.).
  • Present all words or sentences taken from the text that show that your interpretation is right and comment on it. Don’t forget to refer or quote the text.
  • Write a conclusion as a summary of the results of your detailed analysis.
  • At last ask yourself:
    • Does your introduction lead to the detailed analysis of one or more characters?
    • Have you referred to or quoted the text?
    • Does your conclusion offer a convincing summary of what you have found?
7. Expressing emotions

When you write a text about your feelings and emotions you will need many adjectives. Your text will be more interesting if you use a variety of different words. Here are some examples:

afraid – alarmed, horrified, terrified, shocked, frightened
angry – annoyed, furious, stressed
bad – wicked, lousy, foul, ill
confused – shy, upset, doubtful, uncertain, tense, irritated
depressed – disappointed, powerless, guilty, discouraged, sad
good – fine, well, OK, sweet, nice, friendly, great, super, fantastic
happy – great, excited, lucky, ecstatic, terrific, thankful
helpless – alone, frustrated, useless, empty
interested – curious, concerned, nosy
lonely – unloved, unwanted, abandoned
sad – down, unhappy, depressed, blue
tired – bored, sleepy, dull, fatigued

Musterlösung „Generation Conflict“

1.2 Comprehension

Answer in complete sentences! Don’t just copy from the text and answer the questions in your own words.
1) According to the text: In which two ways can young people react when something isn’t allowed?
(Some people stay at home, lay on the couch and lock their doors, while others just leave the house wearing what they like to wear.)
2) What other fashion experiments can you find in the text?
(Other fashion experiments are dying hair in crazy colours and experimenting with make-up, wearing old fashioned clothes or torn jeans with lacy underwear underneath or getting a piercing.)
3) What solution(s) does the text suggest?
(One solution could be to talk to the parents. One should not run away from an argument.)
4) The text begins with two typical remarks. Write down three other “typical” remarks your parents could say.
(When I was young, we were not allowed to do this.
Back in my childhood children had discipline.
You look like a parrot in those clothes…)

1.3. Discuss

1) Why are arguments necessary for the development of a young person? (e.g. learn to stick to your opinion, learn how to discuss things in a serious matter, take criticism …)
2) Should parents be strict and forbid their kids certain clothes or trends? Why or why not? (In my opinion, parents should not be too strict because children have to make their own experiences …)

3.1 Comprehension

a) True or false?
In the Stone Age people had to do everything by themselves. TRUE

b) Multiple Choice
The family went on holidays in the Caribbean Sea.

c) What was the home sitter supposed to do while the family was on holidays?
The home sitter was supposed to water the flowers, feed the dog and the cat, check the mail, answer the phone, clean the rooms once a week and air out the rooms, pull the blinds up and down and check if everything was in order.

d) Discuss. Do you believe in love at first sight? (This question is not easy to answer. On the one hand … One the other hand … After all I believe …)

4.1 Comprehension

1) Write a summary of the plot!
(In the dialogue “Betty and Jenny” is about two women that are neighbours and meet for the first time. …)
2) Give a short characterization of Betty and Jenny.
(Betty: nosy, wants to know everything, doesn’t let Jenny finish her sentence …
Jenny: she behaves like she comes from a big city, talks about how small the village is, talks about all the money they earned…)
3) What do you think about the solution for Jenny’s family problem?
(Do you agree or disagree? Why?)
4) Do you think that Betty and Jenny will become friends?
(Look at your characterization first and than give your opinion.)
5) Write a dialogue between Hillary and one of her new classmates, telling the story from her point of view.
Your story could start like this:

Hillary: Excuse me, is this seat taken?
Sue: No, have a seat. Are you the new girl?
Hillary: Yes, my name is Hillary.
Sue: Nice to meet you, I’m Sue. Where are you from?
Hillary: I’m from Chicago.
Sue: Wow, this place here is much smaller! Do you miss Chicago?
Hillary: …

Sum up the story from Hillary’s point of view. Would she miss her friends? Would she like living in the country? Does she want to spent more time with her parents? …

The Magic of Films

1. Movies in Hollywood

Hollywood is a suburb of Los Angeles, California. The film industry started in Hollywood in the early 20th Century and soon this suburb became home to many great movie stars. In the early days of Hollywood cinema there were four major film companies (Columbia, Paramount, RKO, Warner Bros.) and several minor companies as well as rental studios. A pioneer of American motion pictures was the director D.W. Griffith. By the 1920s Hollywood was world famous for its productions, promoting stars like Jean Harlow, Judy Garland and Marlene Dietrich. Between 1930 and 1945 the city and the entire area changed into a huge entertainment factory controlled by two giant studios, Metro Goldwyn Mayer Inc. (MGM) and Paramount. World famous are the Hollywood Sign, the Sunset Boulevard and the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

When TV was developed, the Hollywood studios began to decline, because fewer people went to the cinemas and making movies also became more expensive. However, TV studios and music production companies moved to Hollywood, continuously changing the character of boomtown. Today movies are still made in Hollywood and Universal Studios – where one can watch the stars live on set – are one of California’s greatest tourist attractions. American movies are watched by a world wide audience shaping our ideas about the American Way of Life. Unfortunately, for many people this is the only source to learn about the United States, which often creates an unrealistic, distorted view of America. (Words: 293)

Vocabulary:

suburb - Vorstadt
huge - groß
giant - riesig
decline - nachlassen, abflauen, zurückgehen
fewer - weniger
to distort - verzerren
view - Sicht

1.2 Reading Comprehension

Right or wrong? Please circle the correct answer.

1.

Hollywood started making movies in the early 19th century.

true

false

2.

In the early days of Hollywood there where many different film companies.

true

false

3.

With the dawn of TV, Hollywood studios became even more successful.

true

false

4.

The success of Hollywood changed the appearance of the entire area.

true

false

5.

The Paramount Studios are a famous tourist attraction.

true

false

6.

American movies show a realistic picture of the American Way of Life.

true

false

2. American English vs. British English

You may have noticed that some words are spelled differently. There are also many different words used in British and American English. Below you find a few examples.

Die folgende Tabelle ist aus technischen Gründen in der mobilen Version der Homepage nicht sichtbar. Bitte rufen Sie die Seite mit einen PC auf. Alternativ können Sie die pdf Datei am Ende der Seite öffnen.

Bitte entschuldigen Sie die Unannehmlichkeiten.

Deutsch
Anhänger (Auto)
Anwalt
Apotheke

Arbeit

Arznei, Medizin

Auseinandersetzung

ausfüllen (Formular)

Autobahn

Bahnsteig

Benzin
Berufschule

böse, irr, verrückt

Briefkasten

Briefträger
Bonbon

2te Etage
Garten
Geldbeutel
Hauptfach

Fahrstuhl / Aufzug

Farbe

Film

Firma
Flugzeug

Friseur (Frauen)

Friseur (Männer)
Führerschein

Fußball

Fußgängerüberweg
Geldschein

Gepäck

Geschmack, Aroma

Grundschule

Halbjahr, Semester

Herbst
Hose

Kino
Klasse (Schule)

Kleiderschrank

Kneipe
Kumpel
krank
Mülleimer
nach Maß

Papiertaschentuch

Programm
Punkt

Schulleiter

Schulzeugnis

streiten

Stundenplan

Tankstelle

Taschenlampe

Urlaub, Ferien

Verkäufer/in
weiterführende
Schule

Wohnung

Zentrum

BE
caravan
solicitor, barrister
chemist's (shop)

labour

medicine

row

to fill in

motorway

platform

petrol
technical college

mad

letterbox

postman
sweet

on the second floor
garden
purse
main subject

lift

colour

film

company
aeroplane

hairdresser

hairdresser
driving license

football

pedestrian crossing
note

luggage

flavour

(basic) primary school

term

autumn
trousers

cinema
class

wardrobe

pub
mate
ill
rubbish bin
made-to-measure

tissue

programme
full stop

headmaster/mistress
head teacher

school report

to quarrel

timetable

filling station

torch

holiday

shop assistant

secondary school

flat

centre

AE
trailer
attorney, lawyer
drugstore

labor

drugs

argument

to fill out

freeway, interstate

track

gas
vocational school

crazy

mailbox

mailman
candy

on the third floor
yard
wallet
major

elevator

color

movie

enterprise
airplane

hairdresser, beauty shop

barber shop
driver’s license

soccer

crosswalk
bill

baggage, luggage

flavor

elementary school
grade school

semester

fall
pants

movie theater
grade

closet

bar
buddy
sick
garbage can
custom-made

Kleenex

program
period

principal

report card

to argue

schedule

gas station

flashlight

vacation

store clerk, vender

High School

apartment

center

As you can see, there are spelling differences and often the used words are completely different. Furthermore, there are also differences in pronunciation, punctuation, the use of tenses, the spelling of the dates and many other distinctions. You might have noticed that the headlines in this exercise are mostly in capital letters. In British English only the first word of a headline is spelled in capital letters.

English is spoken in many different countries of the world which explains the many varieties of the English language. Scottish and Irish English, Canadian English, Australian English and South African English all vary to the Queen’s English.

3. The Portrait of a Star

This chapter is about the magic of movies. At the end you will be able to do a group project on your favorite movie star. Before you start, try to collect homepage-addresses, pictures, articles and other interesting material and make your own notes in a separate exercise book.

3.1. Homepage of a Star: Johnny Depp

Look at www.johnnydepp.com and you will find nearly everything there is to know about his life. You will find many pictures and movie trailers and his filmography. Below you find an excerpt from his biography:

Johnny Depp, born in Kentucky on June 9th 1963 has followed a bizarre road, consequently landing him as one of today's top Hollywood actors. Born John Christopher Depp II, young Depp was originally interested in pursuing a music career. Following a move to Florida, and his parents divorce by age 16, Depp strayed from his peers and siblings and reclused within a life of drugs and alcohol. Teenage Depp dropped out of school to pursue a career in rock and roll music. Over the next few years, Depp fronted numerous garage bands - the most famous entitled The Kids, opened for Iggy Pop. Perhaps more importantly, the success of The Kids furnished Depp with a rising sense of popularity and accomplishment - ironically shot down by Iggy Pop himself during a back-stage confrontation. [......]

In 1998, Depp split with supermodel Kate Moss and started a relationship with French singer Venessa Paradis [sic], relocating to Paris with his two children (Lily-Rose and Jack) in hope to pursue a more normal life. [.......]

When Depp returned to Hollywood, it was with none other than the smash hit Pirates of the Caribbean (2003) - which made $200 million in only four weeks. [.......]” (Words: 200)

Vocabulary:

to stray - weglaufen, umherirren
peer - Gleichaltriger
siblings - Geschwister
to recluse - als Einsiedler leben
to furnish - versehen, ausstatten
to pursue - fortführen, betreiben

3.2. Homepage of a Star: Cameron Diaz

Now look at http://www.cameron-diaz.org and you will find a lot of information about this Hollywood actress. You can read her biography and filmography. This homepage is different to the one of Johnny Depp. Why do you think that is?

Below you find an excerpt from Cameron Diaz’ homepage:

Cameron Michelle Diaz was born August 30, 1972 and raised in Long Beach, California. Cameron, part Cuban, part Native-American and part German, was a mischievous kid and says that she would ’cause trouble and then duck it’. When Cameron was just 16 years old, she was scouted by Elite Models and left home to pursue a modeling [sic] career. In the next 5 years, she lived in big fashion-locations such as Paris, Japan, Australia, Mexico and Marocco and was a model for Kalvin Clein, Levi’s and Coca-Cola.

In 1994, at the age of 21, Cameron auditioned for the role as Jim Carrey’s girlfriend, femme fatale Tina Carlyle, in comedy The Mask. […] After starring opposite Ewan McGregor in Danny Boyle’s A Life Less Ordinary, she took on the title role in blockbuster romantic comedy There’s Something About Mary, directed by the Farrelly brothers. […]

During 2004 and 2005, Cameron explored some of the environmentally unique locations on the planet while discovering ways to help preserve them for the 10-episode series Trippin’ on MTV. She travelled with friends like Drew Barrymore, Jessica Alba, Rbecca Rominj Stamos and Kid Rock. When talking about the series Cameron says “I didn’t want a reality show about me being cute, I wanted to make the locations the star. Patagonia is one of the purest places on the planet, but now it’s starting to fall apart from the pollution”. […]

Who knows what more the future has in store for Cameron Diaz, and to quote herself; “I don’t know what I’m doing half the time, but I enjoy doing it”, […] (Words: 265)

Vocabulary:

mischievous - bösartig, schadenfroh, spitzbübisch
duck it - den Kopf einziehen, kneifen
auditioned - vorsprechen
blockbuster - Kassenschlager, Renner
environmentally - ökologisch, umweltbedingt
unique - einzigartig, unverwechselbar
cute - niedlich, knuffig
pollution - Umweltverschmutzung
in store - vorrätig, hier: was die Zukunft bereit hält

3.3 Your Task

Describe your favorite movie star and give all additional information about her or him that you find interesting.

Here are a few questions that might help you:

  • Is she or he a good actress/actor?
  • Does she or he like to play difficult/funny/complex/mean/positive/negative characters?
  • What are the most famous roles?
  • What are your favorite movies by your star?
  • Do the media focus on the private life rather than the movie roles? …

You can create a little journal, a speech or a wall newspaper.

4. A Group Project

If you would like to prepare a group project you have to complete the following steps:

1st step:

Decide on the topic.

2nd step:

Where and how can you get the necessary material?
Think of websites, photos and texts from magazines, books, newspapers or material from fan clubs. Does anybody in your group have a special skill (e.g. great illustrator)?

3rd step:

Collect and organize your material.
Make a list of everything you have collected and mark important parts in each text.
Decide on the tasks of each person in your group and distribute the necessary material.

4th step:

Plan your presentation.

Below you find some useful tips to deliver your presentation:

DON’TS

DOS

Don’t just read a finished text out loud because your listeners will get bored quickly.

Try to speak freely with the help of the notes you made. Highlight keywords. Try to look people in the eye, this will keep them focused.

Don’t give the whole job to one person – it is a group project!

Every group member needs a task.

Don’t let one person do all the talking.

Every group member should speak.

Don’t just use one medium.

Try to use different media. Hang up a poster, play a CD with film music or – if you have the possibility – show parts of a video.

5. Preparing an Interview

Imagine you have the possibility to interview your favorite celebrity. Make a list of questions you would like to ask him or her.

Below you find some useful examples:

  • Introduce yourself and thank the interviewee for their time.
  • You don’t need to ask your star where he or she was born. Do you research!
  • Focus on interesting questions!
  • When did you start your career?
  • Where did you go to school?
  • What would you do if you hadn’t become an actor/musician/politician … ?
  • Do you still have a lot of free time? What do you like to do in your free time?
  • How important is family/fame/religion … to you? …
5.1 Your Task

1. Write a dialogue between you as a reporter and a star you like. You are the interviewer.
2. You can use your made up interview to practice reported speech.
3. Write a short text about your favorite star or group (about 100 words).
Use the following questions:

  • Who is your favorite star or group?
  • What do you know about him, her or them?
  • Have you seen your favorite star or group on TV/live on stage? – When?
  • What do your parents think of him, her or them?
  • Do they have any reasons for their thoughts?
  • Do you buy shirts or other products with the name or picture of him, her or them?
6. Harry Potter and Joanne Kathleen Rowling

The adventures of the young wizard are international bestsellers and the movies that followed have been highly successful. Harry Potter is the central character in a series of books for children and adults alike. Since 1997, when the first book, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone was published, more than 30 million copies have been sold worldwide. The books follow the brave adventures of a boy who learns on his 11th birthday that he is the orphaned son of two powerful wizards and that he has magical power. Harry is called from his life as an unwanted foster child to become a student at Hogwarst, an English boarding school for wizards. He makes several new friends there who later become his closest allies and help him discover the truth about his parents’ mysterious death. The author of these children’s books is Joanne K. Rowling. When she was interviewed by internet users she talked about how she wrote Harry Potter:

Q.:

Where do you get your ideas from?

Rowling:

I wish I knew. Sometimes they just come like magic and at other times I have to sit and think about a week before I manage to work out how something will happen. Where the idea for Harry Potter actually came from I really couldn’t tell you. I was travelling on a train between Manchester and London and it just popped into my head. I spent four hours thinking about what Hogwarts would be like – the most interesting journey I’ve ever taken. By the time I got off the train many of the characters in the books had already been invented.

Q.:

Are any of the characters in the books based on real people?

Rowling:

Tricky question! The answer is yes, and no. I have to confess that Harry’s friend Hermine is a little bit like I was at her age, though I was never as clever or as annoying (I hope!). Ron is a little bit like my oldest friend and Professor Snape is a lot like one of my old teachers, but I’m not saying which one.

Q.:

Did you expect the Harry Potter books to be this successful?

Rowling:

Never. I just wrote the sort of thing I liked reading when I was younger (and still enjoy them now!). In fact, I didn’t expect lots of people to like them.

Ms. Rowling’s talent as a writer has made her one of Britain’s wealthiest women. She is the third best paid woman in the country. In June 2000 she was honoured by the Queen for her service to children’s literature in a special ceremony.
(Source: The Daily Telegraph, July 3 2000.)

Vocabulary:

brave - tapfer
orphaned - verwaist
foster child - Pflegekind
annoying - lästig, nervig, störend
wealthiest - vermögendste

6.1 Questions on the Text

Complete the sentences by using suitable phrases or facts from the text.

1) The first volume of the series appeared in _______________________.
2) Since then people all over the world bought __________________________.
3) That’s why J. K. Rowling became one of the _____________________________________.

Give your own opinion.
1) If you had magical power, how would you use it?
2) What do you prefer: reading or seeing a film? Give reasons for your answer.

Translate the following sentences:
1. Welches Buch magst du lieber? Harry Potter Band I oder Band II?
________________________
2. Was lesen Sie am liebsten?
________________________
3. Ich möchte einen guten Reiseführer auf Deutsch kaufen.
________________________
4. Haben Sie auch Kalender mit Photos aus dieser Gegend?
________________________
5. Ich brauche ein Geburtstagsgeschenk. Haben Sie den neuen Harry Potter?

.

Musterlösung „The Magic of Films“

1.2 Reading Comprehension


1. false
2. true
3. false
4. true
5. false
6. false

3.2, 3.3, 5.1

There is no right or wrong answer to these questions. If you have to answer tasks like these, always make notes before you start writing the entire text. This will help you to structure your text well. Always answer in full sentences and pay attention to good English. Always reread what you have written.

6.1 Questions on the Text

Complete the sentences by using suitable phrases or facts from the text.

1) The first volume of the series appeared in 1997.
2) Since then people all over the world bought more than 30 million books.
3) That’s why J. K. Rowling became one of the wealthiest women in Great Britain.

Give your own opinion.
1) If you had magical power, how would you use it?
2) What do you prefer: reading or seeing a film? Give reasons for your answer.

There is no right or wrong answer to these questions. Be careful to give enough arguments to back up your opinion and pay attention to good English.

Translate the following sentences:
1. Which book do you prefer? Harry Potter Volume one or two?
2. What do you prefer reading?

What kind of literature do you prefer?
3. I would like to buy a good travel guide in German.
4. Do you also have calendars with photos of this region?
5. I need/am looking for a birthday present. Do you have the new Harry Potter?

Themenbereich Generation Conflict

Generation Conflict

In this exercise you will practise how to answer questions on the text, how to express your feelings and emotions and how to write summaries and characterizations.

1. How to become more interesting

“I won’t allow you to go out in this mini skirt” – or: “We don’t expect you to wear these tight black jeans and those shoes with the high heels”:

Many youngsters have often heard these remarks and the result was either that they stayed at home and lay on the couch in their room with the doors locked, or the result was that they rushed out of the house and did it for spite. Sounds familiar? Maybe your friends have encouraged you to talk to your parents: “I know, you expect me to wear things you think are fashionable for young people but I prefer to put on things which I think suit me. You can’t count on me learning at school if I look silly.” If your parents are sensible people their response might be like this. “I believe that our daughter is no longer a child, she has taken the first steps towards becoming a grown-up.” Or “She is still our daughter, we are a respected family and I dislike her walking in the street in these clothes.”

There are many other things teens can be blamed for. They can dye their hair preferably green or other crazy colours and experiment with make-up, they can wear old-fashioned trousers they found in the attic, they can put on intentionally torn jeans with black lacy underwear everybody can see through or they can have their ears, their noses or eye brows pierced. And Dad can’t help saying that only bulls wear a nose ring like that.

Even the strictest parents cannot prevent their children from doing something that seems “modern”, even the most diplomatic parents don’t often find a way of stopping new trends. When you plan to act grown-up don’t keep away from arguments but try to find solutions. Parents always can be a problem, can’t they?
(Words: 308)

Vocabulary:

spite
encouraged
a grown-up
to dye ones hair
intentionally
torn
lacy underwear
argument

Boshaftigkeit, Gehässigkeit
ermutigt, angespornt
ein Erwachsener
sich die Haare färben
aus Absicht, absichtlich, vorsätzlich
zerrissen, eingerissen
Spitzenunterwäsche
Streit, Diskussion, Auseinandersetzung

1.2 Comprehension

1) According to the text: In which two ways can young people react when something isn’t allowed?
2) What other fashion experiments can you find in the text?
3) What solution(s) does the text suggest?
4) The text begins with two typical remarks. Write down three other “typical” remarks your parents could say.

1.3. Discuss

1) Why are arguments necessary for the development of a young person?
2) Should parents be strict and forbid their kids certain clothes or trends? Why or why not?

2. How to answer “Questions on the text”

Read the text once.
Read the text a second time. Make notes or underline important words or phrases.
Look up words you don’t know before you answer questions.

There are different forms of “Questions on the texts”.

If you have to answer questions

  • only include the author’s opinion
  • do not comment (I think, In my opinion …)
  • use your own words
  • (If you do use a quote, make the quote visible with quotation marks “” and give the line of the text.)

Sometimes questions on the text can be true or false or multiple choice questions.

These questions can be a bit tricky. Always read the questions carefully and make sure you understand the question correctly. Look closely at the text before you answer the questions.

As you get older you will be asked to give your opinion on something more and more. Many of the useful arguments you can use for your own argumentation are “hidden” in the text already. When you give your opinion

  • make notes first, this helps you to structure your text
  • use phrases like: In my opinion, I think/believe, I find this (text) …
  • don’t just state an argument, explain what you mean
  • give examples
  • always re-read your text
3. How to get a son-in-law

If you paid attention to your history teacher you might remember that in the Stone Age our ancestors had to do everything by themselves. But in the course of time there have been many specialisations. Bakers bake our bread, farmers produce our food, policemen look after our security and tailors make our clothes. Today, there are even home sitters for your house or flat when you go on a holiday.

When our family left the town for the Caribbean Sea the home sitter was instructed: 1) watering the flowers, 2) feeding the dog and the cat, 3) getting the mail out of the mail box, 4) answering the telephone, 5) cleaning the rooms once a week – the family’s cleaner, Mrs Porridge, was supposed to help – and airing the rooms every day, 7) pulling down the blinds at night and pulling them up next morning, 8) checking whether everything is in order.

Our home sitter wasn’t allowed to smoke or empty all the bottles of wine and cognac. No girl was permitted to stay during the night either! But there was one exception. It was a rainy afternoon when the doorbell rang. Our home sitter went to the front door. There was a young girl with a huge umbrella at the door. She was rather beautiful, as far as our home sitter could tell. She was wearing denim jeans, shoes with high heels and a sweater.

Our home sitter wasn’t surprised, as the doorbell often rang and people delivered newspapers and magazines or wanted to sell something. Our pretty girl on the other hand was totally amazed to see the young man opening the door because she had never seen him before. She began to stutter nervously, “What are you doing here? Where are my parents?” It was a funny situation when they where sitting together having their dinner. They had a lot to talk about. One can say it was love at first sight! When our family came back from our holidays my wife almost passed out when she saw our home sitter holding hands with our daughter.
(Words: 348)

Vocabulary:

Stone Age
ancestors
instructed
blinds
permitted
exception
to stutter
love at first sight
to pass out

Steinzeit
Vorfahren
angewiesen
Jalousien
erlaubt, gestattet
Ausnahme, Sonderfall
stottern, stammeln
Liebe auf den ersten Blick
ohnmächtig werden

3.1 Comprehension

a) True or false?
In the Stone Age people had to do everything by themselves. T F

b) Multiple Choice

The family went on holidays in the

Caribbean Sea
The Baltic Sea
Canada

c) What was the home sitter supposed to do while the family was on holidays?

d) Give your opinion. Do you believe in love at first sight?

4. Expression of feelings and opinions

Betty and Jenny

First read the dialogue between the two women, than try to answer the questions.

Betty: Hi! I’m Betty Miller, nice to meet you. We’re neighbours. I live over there.
Jenny: Oh, pleased to meet you. My name is ...
Betty: Jenny Clyber, I know. And you and your family just moved here from Chicago to take over old Watson’s gas station. (laughs) Right?
Jenny: (also laughs) Right! It’s a small village here. News travel quickly!
Betty: Well, it’s really a small place. Did you run a gas station in Chicago, too?
Jenny: Well, actually Harry, that’s my husband, until recently he was running a chain of hundreds of gas stations all over the country.
Betty: Hundreds? Wow! So, how comes – I’m sorry, I guess times are hard, aren’t they?
Jenny: No, no nothing like this! The company he was working for is in good shape. And they didn’t want him to leave. No, we decided to downsize!
Betty: Ah...., I see.
Jenny: It’s probably difficult to understand. But sometimes you realize that success and money aren’t everything. Hardly ever did he see our children.
Betty: Oh.
Jenny: Harry was always under terrible pressure. He had a twelve-hour day on average. He was travelling here and there and everywhere and had only very little time at home.
Betty: Oh, that’s tough. For every family member!
Jenny: It wasn’t easy. We were living in a beautiful home with all that..., but, you know, when you never see each other...
Betty: You have two kids, don’t you?
Jenny: Yes, a girl and a boy. Patrick is 16 and Hillary is 15. And they were growing up without their father. And he didn’t know what was going on in their lives.
Betty: So, did something happen? I’m sorry, I shouldn’t ask questions. My husband William always tells me not to stick my nose in where it doesn’t belong.
Jenny: (laughs) It’s not a secret! There was a special moment that changed things for us. It was Hillary’s birthday. She was celebrating with some friends when Harry arrived home, tired as usual. He had completely forgotten that it was Hillary’s birthday. As soon as he came into the house he started to complain about the loud music. Well, when he found out what was going on, he was shocked. And he started to ask himself what kind of father he was...
Betty: Not enough parents ask themselves that question...
Jenny: After that we all sat together and we discussed what we thought about the situation. We asked what was important to us, what we could do. We all agreed that we couldn’t continue that way and that we needed to change things – although our two kids didn’t want to move away from their friends!
Betty: You can’t have everything in life. And I’m sure they’re happy their father is there for them now.
Jenny: Exactly. Anyway, to cut a long story short, Harry left his job; we sold our house in Chicago and moved here. From now on one gas station will be enough!
Betty: Well, I think it’s a wonderful story. Not everyone would have changed life in that way. I really admire you!
(Words: 493)

Vocabulary:

gas station
to run
to guess
shape
to downsize
pressure
on average
to celebrate
to complain
to admire

Tankstelle
hier: betreiben
meinen, denken, annehmen (AE), ahnen
Zustand, Form
verkleinern, herunterfahren
Druck
im Durchschnitt
etwas feiern, zelebrieren
beschweren, beklagen, jammern
bewundern

4.1 Comprehension

1) Write a summary of the plot!
2) Give a short characterization of Betty and Jenny.
3) What do you think about the solution for Jenny’s family problem?
4) Do you think that Betty and Jenny will become friends?
5) Write a dialogue between Hillary and one of her new classmates, telling the story from her point of view.

5. How to write a summary
  • Read the text carefully! Try to understand what the text is about.
  • When you clearly understand the writer's major point (or purpose) for writing, read the text again. This time underline the major points (words or phrases here and there rather than complete sentences) and/or make notes on the side.
  • Now begin writing your summary. Start with a sentence naming the writer and text title and stating the main idea. Then write your summary with every important aspect of the text.
  • In a summary, do not insert your own opinions or thoughts; instead summarize what the writer has to say about the subject.
  • Try to write fluently – connect the paragraphs with words and phrases like:

in addition – moreover – furthermore – on the one hand … on the other hand – what is more – additionally – finally – at last – after all – to sum up – to come to a conclusion – in the end

  • After you've completed your text, read your summary carefully and check for accuracy. (Does your summary make the same points as the article? Do you have forgotten anything important? Are there spelling mistakes? Are you judging what the author is saying?)
  • Keep in mind that a summary should generally be no more than one-fourth the length of the original. If your summary is too long, cut out words rather than ideas. Delete non-essential words or phrases.
6. How to write a characterization

Please note:
There are two different kinds of characterization:
Direct characterization: There is a concrete information about the look and character of a person (blond hair, fat, small, loud, always laughing, sad eyes …)
Indirect characterization: There is a description of a person’s appearance and experience, so that you can suggest the person’s character.

  • Read the text carefully. Find out all about the character(s). Mark the words or sentences or write down the lines that give you information about the character(s).
  • Ask yourself if the character(s) change(s) during the development of the text. If so, how do(es) he / she / they change and why?
  • At the beginning of your characterization write a short introduction in which you present the character(s) and his or her (their) situation.
  • Write in paragraphs. Every paragraph should deal with one characteristic feature (e.g. polite, angry, nervous, etc.).
  • Present all words or sentences taken from the text that show that your interpretation is right and comment on it. Don’t forget to refer or quote the text.
  • Write a conclusion as a summary of the results of your detailed analysis.
  • At last ask yourself:
    • Does your introduction lead to the detailed analysis of one or more characters?
    • Have you referred to or quoted the text?
    • Does your conclusion offer a convincing summary of what you have found?
7. Expressing emotions

When you write a text about your feelings and emotions you will need many adjectives. Your text will be more interesting if you use a variety of different words. Here are some examples:

afraid – alarmed, horrified, terrified, shocked, frightened
angry – annoyed, furious, stressed
bad – wicked, lousy, foul, ill
confused – shy, upset, doubtful, uncertain, tense, irritated
depressed – disappointed, powerless, guilty, discouraged, sad
good – fine, well, OK, sweet, nice, friendly, great, super, fantastic
happy – great, excited, lucky, ecstatic, terrific, thankful
helpless – alone, frustrated, useless, empty
interested – curious, concerned, nosy
lonely – unloved, unwanted, abandoned
sad – down, unhappy, depressed, blue
tired – bored, sleepy, dull, fatigued

Musterlösung „Generation Conflict“

1.2 Comprehension

Answer in complete sentences! Don’t just copy from the text and answer the questions in your own words.
1) According to the text: In which two ways can young people react when something isn’t allowed?
(Some people stay at home, lay on the couch and lock their doors, while others just leave the house wearing what they like to wear.)
2) What other fashion experiments can you find in the text?
(Other fashion experiments are dying hair in crazy colours and experimenting with make-up, wearing old fashioned clothes or torn jeans with lacy underwear underneath or getting a piercing.)
3) What solution(s) does the text suggest?
(One solution could be to talk to the parents. One should not run away from an argument.)
4) The text begins with two typical remarks. Write down three other “typical” remarks your parents could say.
(When I was young, we were not allowed to do this.
Back in my childhood children had discipline.
You look like a parrot in those clothes…)

1.3. Discuss

1) Why are arguments necessary for the development of a young person? (e.g. learn to stick to your opinion, learn how to discuss things in a serious matter, take criticism …)
2) Should parents be strict and forbid their kids certain clothes or trends? Why or why not? (In my opinion, parents should not be too strict because children have to make their own experiences …)

3.1 Comprehension

a) True or false?
In the Stone Age people had to do everything by themselves. TRUE

b) Multiple Choice
The family went on holidays in the Caribbean Sea.

c) What was the home sitter supposed to do while the family was on holidays?
The home sitter was supposed to water the flowers, feed the dog and the cat, check the mail, answer the phone, clean the rooms once a week and air out the rooms, pull the blinds up and down and check if everything was in order.

d) Discuss. Do you believe in love at first sight? (This question is not easy to answer. On the one hand … One the other hand … After all I believe …)

4.1 Comprehension

1) Write a summary of the plot!
(In the dialogue “Betty and Jenny” is about two women that are neighbours and meet for the first time. …)
2) Give a short characterization of Betty and Jenny.
(Betty: nosy, wants to know everything, doesn’t let Jenny finish her sentence …
Jenny: she behaves like she comes from a big city, talks about how small the village is, talks about all the money they earned…)
3) What do you think about the solution for Jenny’s family problem?
(Do you agree or disagree? Why?)
4) Do you think that Betty and Jenny will become friends?
(Look at your characterization first and than give your opinion.)
5) Write a dialogue between Hillary and one of her new classmates, telling the story from her point of view.
Your story could start like this:

Hillary: Excuse me, is this seat taken?
Sue: No, have a seat. Are you the new girl?
Hillary: Yes, my name is Hillary.
Sue: Nice to meet you, I’m Sue. Where are you from?
Hillary: I’m from Chicago.
Sue: Wow, this place here is much smaller! Do you miss Chicago?
Hillary: …

Sum up the story from Hillary’s point of view. Would she miss her friends? Would she like living in the country? Does she want to spent more time with her parents? …

Zurück nach oben Zurück: Modale Hilfsverben - Ersatzformen Vorwärts: Der Aussagesatz